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Re(7): Beersheba British xx Corps success 100 yrs. ago.
IP: 1.129.109.96


Sooner than sell them to the locals who would work them cruely.
They decided on the option below.
Must have been hard for the riders,as any horse lover would know.


Australia sent more than 135,000 horses to World War I, most of them as troop horses in the Middle East.

Mr Haydon's family sent three of those horses. His great uncles Guy and Barney Haydon took their own horses to war, as did their neighbour and close friend Max Wright, who was given a horse by the Haydon family.

Barney Haydon and Max Wright rode those same horses until the end of the war; three years in the saddle over many hundreds of kilometres of searing desert and rocky terrain.

By then the already unbreakable bond between horse and rider had grown even stronger. But at war's end, quarantine restrictions meant the horses could not be brought back to Australia.

Faced with them being sold to the local population, many Light Horsemen preferred to shoot their own horses. Though against military regulations, Barney Haydon and Max Wright chose that course.

Thinking about the fate of those loyal horses still moves Mr Haydon to tears.

"That's just horrendous. It chokes me up every time I think about it," he said.

"It was a bit of a blight on history really."
Bless em all.
Regards William.

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